Poetry For Kids: Walt Whitman by Walt WhitmanPoetry For Kids: Walt Whitman by Walt Whitman

Poetry For Kids: Walt Whitman

byWalt WhitmanEditorKaren KarbienerIllustratorKate Evans

Hardcover | May 1, 2017

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Carefully chosen for kids, 35 illustrated poems are presented and explained by New York University professor Karen Karbenier, PhD, a Whitman expert. Walt Whitman includes enlightening commentary for each poem, definitions of key words, and a foreword by the expert. Vibrant illustrations invigorate the poetry.

Starting off with "I Hear America Singing," the collection includes excerpts from "Song of Myself," "O Captain! My Captain!", poems from Leaves of Grass, and many more thought-provoking, descriptive, and kid-friendly selections.

Walt Whitman (1819-1892) was a celebrated American poet, chiefly known for his controversial and highly original poetry collection Leaves of Grass. Born in 1819 on Long Island, he worked as a journalist, teacher, government clerk, and volunteer nurse during the Civil War. Whitman published his seminal work in 1855 with his own money, s...
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Title:Poetry For Kids: Walt WhitmanFormat:HardcoverDimensions:48 pages, 9.38 × 8.38 × 0.5 inPublished:May 1, 2017Publisher:Moondance PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1633221504

ISBN - 13:9781633221505

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from A wonderful introduction to a first class poet.... This beautiful book of poems is a perfect introduction to the famous American poet Walt Whitman. There are 35 carefully chosen poems for kids to enjoy. The poems are presented and explained by New York University professor Karen Karbiener, PhD, a Whitman expert. Each poem features commentary on its content, definitions of perhaps unfamiliar words to a child, and an enlightening forward that gives educational background on the poet himself and how the book is designed. The illustrations make the words come alive contributing a visual form of poetry themselves. The collection features a variety of poems that are kid-friendly and describe life as Walt Whitman saw it. I love at the end of the book a section entitled "What Walt Was Thinking". Here is a taste of one of his poems... A Woman Waits For Me (excerpt) They are not one jot less than I am, They are tanned in the face by shining suns and blowing winds, Their flesh has the old divine suppleness and strength, They know how to swim, row, ride, wrestle, shoot, run, strike, retreat, advance, resist, defend themselves, They are ultimate in their own right -- they are calm, clear, well-possess'd of themselves. Jot: bit (Walt is thinking of tiny drips from his pen) Suppleness: flexibility At the back of the book from: What Walt was Thinking A Woman Waits for Me (1860): Women's rights and abolitionism were two revolutionary movements that developed simultaneously in the mid-nineteenth century. In his journalism, Walk had long defended women's rights for fair salaries and equal treatment. This poem celebrates their strength of character as well as their physical bodies. His ideas were considered so progressive that this pen was banned from publication in 1882. I highly recommend this book (and this series). It would be a beautiful collection to own and what better month to start than April when we celebrate National Poetry Month.
Date published: 2017-04-26

Editorial Reviews

"Weds top-notch scholarship with visual artistry....affording readers the rare pleasure of seeing Whitman's seemingly endless lines run clear across the page, unenjambed as he intended....this dynamic volume proves a seminal addition to any library."--Kirkus Reviews - Kirkus Reviews'Reveals the political and social atmosphere of nineteenth-century America. Whitman's poetry speaks across the decades and seems very pertinent to our world today. His poetry fosters the ideas of equality, tolerance and love for our fellow humans ' - The Guardian Best Books Guide 2017