Telecommunications, Mass Media, and Democracy: The Battle for the Control of U.S. Broadcasting, 1928-1935 by Robert W. McChesney

Telecommunications, Mass Media, and Democracy: The Battle for the Control of U.S. Broadcasting…

byRobert W. McChesney

Paperback | January 1, 1995

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This work shows in detail the emergence and consolidation of U.S. commercial broadcasting economically, politically, and ideologically. This process was met by organized opposition and a general level of public antipathy that has been almost entirely overlooked by previous scholarship.McChesney highlights the activities and arguments of this early broadcast reform movement of the 1930s. The reformers argued that commercial broadcasting was inimical to the communication requirements of a democratic society and that the only solution was to have a dominant role for nonprofit andnoncommercial broadcasting. Although the movement failed, McChesney argues that it provides important lessons not only for communication historians and policymakers, but for those concerned with media and how they are used.

About The Author

Robert W. McChesney is at University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Details & Specs

Title:Telecommunications, Mass Media, and Democracy: The Battle for the Control of U.S. Broadcasting…Format:PaperbackDimensions:416 pages, 9.25 × 6.18 × 1.06 inPublished:January 1, 1995Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195093941

ISBN - 13:9780195093940

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"A devastating and well written analysis of how the New Deal became a great deal for part of American business and a striking case in point of what conventional historians and political scientists refuse to see."--Thomas Ferguson, University of Massachusetts