The Dead and the Gone: Life As We Knew It Series, Book 2

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The Dead and the Gone: Life As We Knew It Series, Book 2

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt | January 18, 2010 | Trade Paperback

The Dead and the Gone: Life As We Knew It Series, Book 2 is rated 4.25 out of 5 by 4.
Susan Beth Pfeffer'sLife as We Knew Itenthralled and devastated readers with its brutal but hopeful look at an apocalyptic event--an asteroid hitting the moon, setting off a tailspin of horrific climate changes. Now this harrowing companion novel examines the same events as they unfold in New York City, revealed through the eyes of seventeen-year-old Puerto Rican Alex Morales. When Alex's parents disappear in the aftermath of tidal waves, he must care for his two younger sisters, even as Manhattan becomes a deadly wasteland, and food and aid dwindle.
With haunting themes of family, faith, personal change, and courage, this powerful new novel explores how a young man takes on unimaginable responsibilities.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 336 pages, 7 × 5 × 0.84 in

Published: January 18, 2010

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0547258550

ISBN - 13: 9780547258553

Appropriate for ages: 13 - 17

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Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from Worth a read through, not as good as the first Life as We Knew It was pretty good. I enjoyed reading it. The Dead and the Gone isn?t really a continuation of the first one, it?s set in a different setting this time in New York City. Instead of a female protagonist, we have a male one who?s like the previous main character, has a family to take care of. What I liked about this book is the development of the setting. I liked how throughout the book areas around Alex and his sisters start dying out, and the city starts getting abandoned slowly. I enjoyed how this was illustrated throughout the story. Character development was well done in this book. I thought Julie did a lot of growing up especially during the last third of the book. Alex, well he did take charge of being the ?man of the house? but he wasn?t a great as a main character as I hoped he would be. Bri on the other hand, just ended up being the annoying character nobody wants to read about. The plot itself isn?t as good as the first one, but it?s still worth a read through at least once at least to see good character development and how it was like in a different setting. I?ll be continuing along this series as it does have a lot of potential. I hope it doesn?t fall short.
Date published: 2014-09-10
Rated 5 out of 5 by from amazing! I would imagine that Susan Beth Pfeffer would have a hard time writing a sequel to a fantastic book titled Life As We Knew It. but, she sure made a great one! The Dead and The Gone is an amazing book in an amazing series. there is a lot more religion in this book then there was in the first one, but i think it really adds to the story. This book is about, not Miranda like the first, but about a boy named Alex, who lives in New York. they both suffer from the same things - after an astroid hits the moon, Alex has to learn to survive with limited resources. He has to take care of his two sisters, and he has no idea where his parents are, which adds on to the stress. readers learn to not take advantage of the little things like food and hot water and clean clothes - because one day, they might not be there. The Dead And The Gone is a fantastic novel. the writing is amazing, and there are many similarities and differences between this book and the first. Alex learns more about himself, and finds strengths and weaknesses that he had not known existed before the astroid hit the moon. Written in journal entries, also like the first, this book will blow you away. You will experience everything Alex goes through as he takes on the responsibilities of not a 17-year-old boy, but a 30-year-old man. you will be right next to him as he learns to survive surrounded by the dead and the gone.
Date published: 2012-10-22
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Quite moving In my opinion, this book was better than the first one. It was completely opposite from Life as We Knew It. They saw dead bodies all the time; many people were at the food giveaways; disease was surrounding them; they lived in a highly populated city; and there was a lot more death. This novel was the complete opposite from Life as We Knew It. Even the characters were opposite! (Miranda has two brothers; Alex had two sisters and a brother). It was interesting seeing Alex's personality change during his experiences. For example, he used to love rules, but he eventually started to dislike them as times grew increasingly difficult. I admired Alex's maturity and his ability to control his anger. He prayed a lot and his Catholic beliefs really played into his personality. Alex knew when he had sinned, and accepted when he was wrong (this is especially hard for men/boys, with their "pride"). Everyone matured, just like in Life as We Knew It. And it was obvious that Alex looked up to his "gone" older brother Carlos and his father Papi. He constantly thought about what they would have done, and if they would be proud of him. But several parts didn't make sense: if Alex, Julie and Briana has the apartment all to themselves, why couldn't they break into the other homes and see what supplies they could find? Also, Chris' father was way too nice to Alex and his family, considering he barely knew them. And, considering they lived so close to everyone else in the city, it should have been extremely likely the would have died from sickness. (I know, there would be no story if this happened, but I just wanted to point out). Especially at the end of this novel, I was extremely moved and it was very emotional. It was not predictable at all. In general the novel was still a bit dull for me since I like fast-paced books. However, I enjoyed this novel, and I look forward to reading the last book, This World We Live In.
Date published: 2012-08-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Riveting! Even Grittier Than "Life As We Knew It." Susan Beth Pfeffer wrote "Life As We Knew It" about a cataclysmic disaster and how a family in a small rural town must fight to stay alive. In this companion book "The Dead & The Gone" she tells about the same disaster only from the point of view of a family in the big city of New York. Impossible to put down. The characters and story are so well written that you will be drawn in - so much so that you will want to start stockpiling food yourself. Can't wait to read the third book where these two families will meet and together will continue their fight to stay alive.
Date published: 2010-03-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Amazing Life As We Knew it is one of my favourite books. It has a great plot, with a great beginning, middle, and ending. Its written in "journal form", meaning it is told through the eyes of Miranda, a teen struggleing to, well, live. I love this book so much because ive never read anything like it. Sure, ive read about the world ending and a group of people trying to stay alive out in the open. There are no buildings, and hardley any food. But thats not what Life As We Knew It is like. miranda is with her family, and readers are by her side constantly throughout her life. She is not just trying to live physially, but emotionally. This book will open your eyes and show you to be greatful for everything you have, even something as simple as a blanket.
Date published: 2012-09-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Touching and emotional This novel was the best one of the three I've read by Pfeffer. It was so emotional and much deeper than I had imagined it could be. I loved how there was a lot of romance incorporated in this book because it had been lacking in the preceding two. It was fast-paced at the end, and the several parts really moved me. This was the only book of the three that I could NOT put down. I was constantly wondering what was going to happen next, and I just loved how everyone had their own unique story. A book could be written from any of their perspectives and it'd be completely different. There were stories that could have come from Julie (esp when they left their old apartment and somehow made their way to Miranda's home), Charlie, Miranda's father, Lisa, and Syl. I wish there was a fourth book because I REALLY want to know what happened after "the end". The author really demonstrated how their personalities had changed from their horrific experiences.This book taught me the power of love and how we should appreciate everything we have, because once it's gone, it's gone forever.
Date published: 2012-08-15
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Quite moving In my opinion, this book was better than the first one. It was completely opposite from Life as We Knew It. They saw dead bodies all the time; many people were at the food giveaways; disease was surrounding them; they lived in a highly populated city; and there was a lot more death. This novel was the complete opposite from Life as We Knew It. Even the characters were opposite! (Miranda has two brothers; Alex had two sisters and a brother). It was interesting seeing Alex's personality change during his experiences. For example, he used to love rules, but he eventually started to dislike them as times grew increasingly difficult. I admired Alex's maturity and his ability to control his anger. He prayed a lot and his Catholic beliefs really played into his personality. Alex knew when he had sinned, and accepted when he was wrong (this is especially hard for men/boys, with their "pride"). Everyone matured, just like in Life as We Knew It. And it was obvious that Alex looked up to his "gone" older brother Carlos and his father Papi. He constantly thought about what they would have done, and if they would be proud of him. But several parts didn't make sense: if Alex, Julie and Briana has the apartment all to themselves, why couldn't they break into the other homes and see what supplies they could find? Also, Chris' father was way too nice to Alex and his family, considering he barely knew them. And, considering they lived so close to everyone else in the city, it should have been extremely likely the would have died from sickness. (I know, there would be no story if this happened, but I just wanted to point out). Especially at the end of this novel, I was extremely moved and it was very emotional. It was not predictable at all. In general the novel was still a bit dull for me since I like fast-paced books. However, I enjoyed this novel, and I look forward to reading the last book, This World We Live In.
Date published: 2012-08-14
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Unique and interesting plot I really liked the concept of this novel; it made so much sense and it almost seems plausible to occur. This book made me appreciate the simple things I have (food, shelter, water, cleanliness, etc) and not take anything for granted. However, it was a bit repetitive at times. There were many "as long as we have each other, we'll be okay" moments. In my opinion, it did not get very climactic, and although it was interesting, I found that I was still able to put the book down. I am completely intrigued by environmental-related storylines, but this book was kind of dull for me. Honestly, I do like this book, but it was not as good as I hoped it to be.
Date published: 2012-08-14
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Different than anything I've read I'm actually surprised I liked this book so much. The base plot was simple; one families struggle to survive when the whole world enters a troubling time. A lot of it had to do with not having enough food or how to function without electricity. However, it was so richly told through Miranda, in the form of her diary, that I couldn't put it down. It really hit home regarding just how much we take for granted in our daily lives. I definitely reccomend it!
Date published: 2012-04-05
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great read, post apocalyptic book for younger readers. No matter how much of this type of book I’ve read in the past another one comes along and it instantly becomes a favorite, replacing the previous one. This one take a little more of a realistic turn (sans aliens and zombies) and goes for what would happen if the moon is knocked closer to earth. Major natural disasters occur, and the weather changes drastically. I admired Miranda’s mom. A lot. She was strong and held her family together, preparing everything in advance when things get worse later. It was as if she had everything under control - something extremely difficult to do especially when the majority of the public are probably panicking and running amok. I also liked Matt who also was strong and acted like the backbone of Miranda’s family too. It did take me a while to like Miranda. There were times when she acted like a spoiled self centered selfish brat, but then there were other times where she would sacrifice anything to help her family. You do tend to forget that she’s just a sixteen year old girl because of her behavior. She acts like an adult at times, but then reverts to her age the next. It’s the same with Johnny too, and he’s younger than Miranda. It’s in crisis situations like these where you see children literally grow up when they should be having fun at their age. The story is told in a diary format, which may not be everyone’s cup of tea, but Miranda doesn’t fill her entries with flowery writing, at times it can get a little whiny and her priorities get a little mixed but her descriptions of what’s going on and how the world is during this crisis is cut and clear. It may not be as graphic as some other post apocalyptic books are, but since this is meant for younger readers, the amount of details is just right. It’s a great post apocalyptic book for younger readers, and I think it’s also a great ‘starter’ book for those that just want a taste of these kinds of books. It’s not over the top graphic detail, but just enough to know that the world Miranda lives in, is filled with a lot of difficulties and hardship. Yet it outlines the importance of family togetherness to survive through the ordeal. This was a great read, and I do recommend this book for readers of any age.
Date published: 2012-02-15
Rated 5 out of 5 by from There isn't a better book! Fantastic! Not reading this book is a crime!
Date published: 2011-09-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Unbelievable Impossible to put down. Impossible not to feel the dangers around you, the blood roaring in your ears, the chills. Absolutely fantastic.
Date published: 2010-09-01
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A great sequel... I really enjoyed this sequel, but not as much as the original book, Life as We Knew It. I really appreciated how the main character, Miranda grows and matures throughout the book - and this is quite apparent at the end of the book when she does something shocking that I did not expect (but was foreshadowed). I found it interesting how the characters changed their standards and expectations for their futures. Funny thing how a bleak and uncertain future would drive you to marry someone an hour after meeting them. Of course, I continued to enjoy the quest for food and supplies (always entertaining). I could also relate to Miranda's efforts to hide her journals and then her eventual decision to leave them behind to document her experiences. Ms. Pfeffer is a gifted writer and has a unique style of writing that appeals to both young and old. Can't wait to read more of her books...
Date published: 2010-07-28
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Thought Provoking I hadn't read "Life As We Knew It" or "The Dead and The Gone" before reading this book, but I don't think it matters. It was a great read though and the concept was scary. Unlike other books in this genre, humans weren't responsable for the destruction of the earth. Overall I found it to be a very enjoyable read although confusing at times. I would have liked to see a little more character developement and maybe a little less attention on religion . Also not much back ground is given about the characters lives before the asteroid, although that may be explained in previous works. Really enojayble read though and I'd definitely recommened it.
Date published: 2010-07-14
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Mesmerizing After a asteroid hits and changes the position of the moon, the catastrophic results are felt all over the world: volcanoes, floods, tsunamis, blizzards, death. Miranda and her loved ones struggle to survive as food becomes scarce, sickness spreads and winter threatens everyone. This book was quite the page turner. I literally had goosebumps as the events unfolded after the asteroid hit. It's a heart wrenching story of love, loss and especially survival as everything Miranda has come to know changes very quickly and sacrifices have to be made. Definitely had me hooked :D
Date published: 2010-03-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Riveting! Even Grittier Than "Life As We Knew It." Susan Beth Pfeffer wrote "Life As We Knew It" about a cataclysmic disaster and how a family in a small rural town must fight to stay alive. In this companion book "The Dead & The Gone" she tells about the same disaster only from the point of view of a family in the big city of New York. Impossible to put down. The characters and story are so well written that you will be drawn in - so much so that you will want to start stockpiling food yourself. Can't wait to read the third book where these two families will meet and together will continue their fight to stay alive.
Date published: 2010-03-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from It's Terrifying To Think How Easily This Book Could Be Non-Fiction. "When a meteor hits the moon and knowcks it closer in orbit to the earth, nothing will ever be the same. Worldwide tidal waves, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions.. and that's just the beginning." I could not put this book down. Realistic characters in a horrific situation of just trying to stay alive. Can't wait to read book two and three of the trilogy.
Date published: 2010-03-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Very satisfying read - couldn't put it down. I love 'end of the world' stories, and this was a great one. I couldn't help but read this story in one sitting. You just can't wait to find out how it ends! The characters were great and the science was believable. I hope Ms. Pfeffer writes more, because I think she's an amazing author.
Date published: 2010-01-10
Rated 4 out of 5 by from What if? What if an asteroid hit the moon and knocked it closer into orbit, causing worldwide tidal waves, earthquakes and volcanic eruptions? What if all the water supply ran out? What if the ashes from the volcanic activity blocked out the sun, causing droughts throughout the world? What if diseases started to spread like fire, and there was no more medicine to revive us? This is what Miranda has to go through with her family. There is limited amount of food and water left, and people are starting to lose faith. Many have already abondoned their homes and left for the south, where things seem to be better. But they're not. It's all the same throughout the world. Disasters strike everywhere, and it's every man for himself. Life As We Knew It is told through Miranda's journal entries of the days that go by. Her family of four are slowly starving themselves to death, and there's nothing they can do about it because it's all the same for the other families. Power has run out and there's no way of knowing if you'll survive the next day. Life As We Knew It was a beautifully written story of hope and courage from a 16 year old girl who has to step up and take responsibility when her family goes ill. People die, but you can't stop, because once you lose hope, there's nothing left to keep you alive. The only thing about this book that bugs me is the unrealistic ending. I'm not going to say what happens, but the chances of that actually happening are very slim. Though it might explain more in the next novel. The Dead and the Gone is not the sequel to Life As We Knew It, but another story told by a boy named Alex living in NYC facing the same challenges as him and his sisters try to survive the new events. A stunning novel; can't wait for the next book.
Date published: 2009-04-28
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Pure genius This book is simply amazing. Just the concept of an asteroid hitting the moon and affecting the Earth in so many ways is enough. It almost makes me think...maybe an asteroid hitting the moon to the position it is at now lead to the extinction of the dinosaurs. I am also a writer, and honestly, im jealous of this author because i wish i thought of the amazing concept first. This novel is so sad yet so entrancing. You honestly wont be able to put it down. The only bad thing i have to say about it is that the ending was a little bit disatisfying...but perhaps that will be fixed with the sequal. Last word: DEFINATLY a must read. Worth your time and money!
Date published: 2008-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Wonderfully Entrancing Novel! As it all starts out; it's like a regular school week. This whole moon excitement seems to Miranda just another reason to get more homework, but she is deadly wrong. After many trails and hardships, Miranda learns how close family is and that even if the earth was ending she would always be closest to them, no matter what happens. Read through Miranda's diary entries through their year of pain and heartbreak, illness and heart-wrenching terror, tinged with the slightest bit of hope to keep them hanging on 'til the end. I absolutely LOVED this book. It was the only book, out of very many books ever, to completely entrance me into subconsciously thinking what was happening in the book was actually happening in real life. One recommendation: Don't put the book down, but don't read it in a dimly lit room at three in the morning; the subconscious effect is almost terrifying. My thinking is that is that because it is written completely in first person, your mind thinks that the unimaginable is happening. If this author ever wrote anything else, I would definitly pick it up straightaway, I would love to embrace that kind of possessing action and drama, five stars!
Date published: 2008-04-05

– More About This Product –

The Dead and the Gone: Life As We Knew It Series, Book 2

The Dead and the Gone: Life As We Knew It Series, Book 2

by Susan Beth Pfeffer

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 336 pages, 7 × 5 × 0.84 in

Published: January 18, 2010

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 0547258550

ISBN - 13: 9780547258553

Read from the Book

chapter 1Wednesday, May 18At the moment when life as he had known it changed forever, Alex Morales was behind the counter at Joey's Pizza, slicing a spinach pesto pie into eight roughly equal pieces."I ordered an antipasto, also.""It's right here, sir," Alex said. "And your order of garlic knots.""Thanks," the man said. "Wait a second. Aren't you Carlos, Luis's kid?"Alex grinned. "Carlos is my older brother," he said. "I'm Alex.""That's right," the man said. "Look, could you tell your dad there's a problem with the plumbing in twelve B?""My father's away for a few days," Alex said. "He's in Puerto Rico for my grandmother's funeral. But he should be back on Saturday. I'll tell him as soon as he gets home.""Don't worry about it," the man said. "It's waited this long. I'm sorry to hear about your grandmother.""Thank you," Alex said."So where is your brother these days?" the man asked."He's in the Marines," Alex said. "He's stationed at Twentynine Palms, in California.""Good for him," the man said. "Give him my regards. Greg Dunlap, apartment twelve B.""I'll do that," Alex said. "And I'll be sure to tell my father about your plumbing."Mr. Dunlap smiled. "You in school?" he asked.Alex nodded. "I go to St. Vincent de Paul Academy," he said."Good school," Mr. Dunlap said. "Bob, my partner, went there and he says it's the best school in the city. You know where you want to go to college?"Alex knew exactly where he wanted to go, and where he'd be happy to go, and where he would be sat
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From the Publisher

Susan Beth Pfeffer'sLife as We Knew Itenthralled and devastated readers with its brutal but hopeful look at an apocalyptic event--an asteroid hitting the moon, setting off a tailspin of horrific climate changes. Now this harrowing companion novel examines the same events as they unfold in New York City, revealed through the eyes of seventeen-year-old Puerto Rican Alex Morales. When Alex's parents disappear in the aftermath of tidal waves, he must care for his two younger sisters, even as Manhattan becomes a deadly wasteland, and food and aid dwindle.
With haunting themes of family, faith, personal change, and courage, this powerful new novel explores how a young man takes on unimaginable responsibilities.

About the Author

Susan Beth Pfefferis the author of many books for teens, including theNew York Timesbest-selling novelLife As We Knew It, which was nominated for several state awards, and its companion books,The Dead and the Gone, This World We Live In,andThe Shade of the Moon. She lives in Middletown, New York.

Editorial Reviews

* "As riveting as Life as We Knew It and even grittier. . . . The powerful images and wrenching tragedies will haunt readers."-Publishers Weekly, starred review

* "Everything Pfeffer writes about seems wrenchingly plausible."-Booklist, starred review

"Incredibly engaging."-Kirkus Reviews

Appropriate for ages: 13 - 17