The Holographic Universe: The Revolutionary Theory of Reality by Michael TalbotThe Holographic Universe: The Revolutionary Theory of Reality by Michael Talbot

The Holographic Universe: The Revolutionary Theory of Reality

byMichael Talbot

Paperback | September 6, 2011

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"Awake-up call to wonder, an adventure in ideas." —Larry Dossey,M.D., author of Space, Time & Medicine

Now witha new foreword by Lynn McTaggart, author of TheField, Michael Talbot’s classic treatise on the latest frontiers of physicsreveals a revolutionary theory of reality, explaining the paranormal abilitiesof the mind, the unsolved riddles of brain and body, and the true nature of theuniverse. Lyall Watson, author of Supernature,calls The Holographic Universe “elegant,” writing, “[Talbot] helps tobridge the artificial gap that has opened up between mind and matter, betweenus and the rest of the cosmos.”

Title:The Holographic Universe: The Revolutionary Theory of RealityFormat:PaperbackDimensions:368 pages, 8 × 5.31 × 0.83 inPublished:September 6, 2011Publisher:HarperCollinsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0062014102

ISBN - 13:9780062014108

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Fascinating A friend recommended this book. I've been reading it slowly. It has opened my mind to the universe's possibilities.
Date published: 2017-05-03
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Do Yoga Dean Radin shows another benefit to yoga practice. Entertaining stories of yogis add to his theory that human development can reach high levels of abilities.
Date published: 2017-04-15
Rated 4 out of 5 by from New possibilities If you are looking for a middle ground that stems the gap between spirituality and science, this is a good start.
Date published: 2015-05-26
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Supernormal is Super-fantastic I recently attended the annual conference of IONS (Institute of Noetic Science) and this was the first time that I had the pleasure of meeting Dean Radin. I mention this because Dean’s speaking style and demeanor are also reflected in “Supernormal”, his most recent book, and these qualities are what make his work interesting and informative. Contrary to what seems to be the standard stereo type of scientists, Dean, Bruce, and the other scientists at IONS have an uncanny ability to make scientific research and technical information more palatable to those who do not have a scientific background. As for the book itself, “Supernormal” is a wonderful blend of scientific research and all things yoga. Dean uses his skills and scientific background to investigate the claims appearing in the ancient Yoga Sutras. Originating around 2000 years ago and compiled and recorded by Patanjali, the Yoga Sutras discuss more than just the standard, physical aspects of yoga, they also discuss mental/meditation practices that enable the practitioner to activate extraordinary powers. Of course many believe that such feats of super human abilities are simply the stuff of exaggerated legends and delusional observations. With standard, repeatable, scientifically based experiments Dean demonstrates that many of the superhuman feats found in the ancient text are indeed possible. Certainly no claim is made that all of the feats can be substantiated; however, there does appear to be a growing body of evidence that supernormal abilities do exist and they are not exclusive to a select few. It has been demonstrated over and over again that pre-cognitive abilities, psychokinesis, telepathy and various other abilities are inherent in everyone, it’s just that these abilities are not as developed as they are in those people who practice certain mental and physical techniques. With modern research in hand Dean shows the reader that it is often the illogical and biased views of a small group of skeptics, who have not kept up with modern research, that use their own personal limitations/biases/agendas to deliberately cast doubt on the research being done at the frontiers of human development. Rather than view the new research with an open mind and stretch the boundaries of their knowledge, they seem to prefer the comfort and certainty that living on a flat earth provides. In my biased opinion, a true scientist is fascinated by the unknown and he/she is motivated to explore new frontiers. I believe that Dean shares these views and he is indeed living the wise words shared by Rumi so long ago, “Sell your cleverness and buy bewilderment.”
Date published: 2013-10-06
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Good read, writing style is clear; which is odd given the concept explored This was definitely a good read, it kept me up late for a week. I had hard time connecting the 'scientific' dots in Mr. Talbot's arguments though, at times he overly simplified issues and left many areas unanswered. I give him thumbs up for his imagination and attempt to present such complex claims in a popular work. At the very least, such ideas open the doors to further scientific exploration.
Date published: 2012-11-12
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Ok but not mind blowing Since I was 15 years old, 30 years ago, I have been growing in my own theories and gathering as much understanding of other peoples thoughts, delving into astro and quantum physics to understand how a creator could exist. It can be seen that the author is a little influenced by certain religious views. Granted everyone is predisposed to believe certain things biased by the views they already hold. I hold that a creator can be theorized and considered outside of religion. With this background in my thinking and study I was expecting some new deeper knowledge and more fascinating insight. The author sounds well educated but I felt like he was just discovering new things I already, have heard, considered or understand. This subject is a rabbit hole that goes deep. I was hoping he would jump in and see how deep it goes. This is just my preference. For some it will be an interesting read and I give my thumbs up. He does make some very good points, speaks about how he would like to see people of different beliefs getting along and it is clear it comes with a good heart behind it.
Date published: 2010-12-21