Candide (Book Center) by Voltaire

Candide (Book Center)

byVoltaire, Book Center

Kobo ebook | March 7, 2017

about

Candide, ou l'Optimisme (1759) is a French satire by the Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire, English translations of which have been titled Candide: Or, All for the Best (1759); Candide: Or, The Optimist (1762); and Candide: Or, Optimism (1947). The novella begins with a young man, Candide, who is living a sheltered life in an Edenic paradise and being indoctrinated with Leibnizian optimism (or simply optimism) by his tutor, Pangloss. The work describes the abrupt cessation of this existence, followed by Candide's slow, painful disillusionment as he witnesses and experiences great hardships in the world. Voltaire concludes with Candide, if not outright rejecting optimism, advocating an enigmatic precept, "we must cultivate our garden", in lieu of the Leibnizian mantra of Pangloss, "all is for the best in the best of all possible worlds".

Title:Candide (Book Center)Format:Kobo ebookPublished:March 7, 2017Publisher:Oregan PublishingLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN:9990052672229

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Reviews

Rated 2 out of 5 by from okay book Kind of funny, not a bad read in the original French version.
Date published: 2018-06-13
Rated 3 out of 5 by from good but the dover thrift edition translation wasn't so good.
Date published: 2018-04-03
Rated 4 out of 5 by from interesting interesting ideas, even after a few hundred years
Date published: 2018-01-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from interesting interesting ideas, even after a few hundred years
Date published: 2018-01-06
Rated 4 out of 5 by from interesting interesting ideas, even after a few hundred years
Date published: 2018-01-06
Rated 3 out of 5 by from philosophy THis is a book to think about not just read and put down, but it's a nice read.
Date published: 2016-11-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Incredible Candide (optimism), first published in 1759, has a lot to do with destiny, and how everything in preordained. Thus, whatever you do to try to change your life, you cannot possibly change it. If you are meant to meet a specific person, no matter what the situation is, you will run into them. This satire is the most unique story I have ever read; I did not know such stories even existed. The protagonist, Candide, is very optimistic, and believes that everything that happens is for the best. Candide is a classic and should be read by everyone; it is very short and can be completed within a few hours. 5/5
Date published: 2009-12-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Incredible Candide (optimism), first published in 1759, has a lot to do with destiny, and how everything in preordained. Thus, whatever you do to try to change your life, you cannot possibly change it. If you are meant to meet a specific person, no matter what the situation is, you will run into them. This satire is the most unique story I have ever read; I did not know such stories even existed. The protagonist, Candide, is very optimistic, and believes that everything that happens is for the best. Candide is a classic and should be read by everyone; it is very short and can be completed within a few hours. 5/5
Date published: 2009-12-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Incredible Candide (optimism), first published in 1759, has a lot to do with destiny, and how everything in preordained. Thus, whatever you do to try to change your life, you cannot possibly change it. If you are meant to meet a specific person, no matter what the situation is, you will run into them. This satire is the most unique story I have ever read; I did not know such stories even existed. The protagonist, Candide, is very optimistic, and believes that everything that happens is for the best. Candide is a classic and should be read by everyone; it is very short and can be completed within a few hours.
Date published: 2008-01-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Quirky but Wise This odd little book has something important to say about life. Voltaire, a philosopher in the late 1700s, presents his cynical outlook on life through his sweet and naive character Candide, who is unlucky in both love and in life. Other players, such as the optimistic Dr. Pangloss, pessimistic Martin, and the object of Candid's affections, the lovely Cunegonde, encounter both fortune and misfortune while on their travels. This book is an important philosophical commentary. Read it!
Date published: 2001-06-06