Womens Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous Recreation by Jacqueline PearsonWomens Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous Recreation by Jacqueline Pearson

Womens Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous Recreation

byJacqueline Pearson

Paperback | November 17, 2005

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The growth of female reading audiences from the mid-eighteenth century to the early Victorian era represents both a vital episode in women's history and a highly significant factor in shaping the literary production of the period. This book offers the first broad overview and detailed analysis of this growing readership, its representation in literature, and its influence. Jacqueline Pearson examines both historical women readers, including Laetitia Pilkington, Elizabeth Carter, Frances Burney and Jane Austen, and a wide range of texts in which the figure of the woman reader is important.

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Title:Womens Reading in Britain, 1750-1835: A Dangerous RecreationFormat:PaperbackDimensions:312 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.71 inPublished:November 17, 2005Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521022991

ISBN - 13:9780521022996

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Table of Contents

Introduction; 1. Pygmalionesses and the pencil under the petticoat: Richardson, Johnson and Byron; 2. What should girls and women read? 3. The pleasures and perils of reading; 4. Pleasures and perils of reading: some case histories; 5. Where and how should women read? 6. Preparing for equality: class, gender, reading; 7. A dangerous recreation: women and novel reading; Conclusion; Notes; Select Bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"This book is compelling reading for scholars of the novel and for general readers alike." Burney Letter